A Lesson To Be Learned

Today's Youth Can Find Relevance in Classic Movie

The+cover+of+the+movie+%E2%80%9CThe+Breakfast+Club%2C%E2%80%9D+retrieved+from+IMDB.
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A Lesson To Be Learned

The cover of the movie “The Breakfast Club,” retrieved from IMDB.

The cover of the movie “The Breakfast Club,” retrieved from IMDB.

The cover of the movie “The Breakfast Club,” retrieved from IMDB.

The cover of the movie “The Breakfast Club,” retrieved from IMDB.

Luke Pitts, Staff Writer

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The Breakfast Club, for as old as it is, remains a cinematic masterpiece that still has social relevance to high schoolers today. Through the masterful characterization and ingenious reconstruction of his characters viewpoints, director John Huges has constructed a moving condemnation of the stereotypes that society pushes onto high schoolers.

The overall premise of the movie is five characters being forced into Saturday detention together. From the beginning of the movie, the five main characters are firmly placed into five different social archetypes: The Athlete, The Princess, The Brain, The Criminal, and The Basketcase. These archetypes are reinforced through these characters’ interactions with their parents and each other. The five social aggregates, and by extension these five characters, have limited social contact with each other in their daily lives. It takes a drastic situation for these characters to finally interact.

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Constraining oneself to any single social stereotype circumvents life experience, causes undue prejudice and wanton malevolence, and narrows interaction”

— Luke Pitts, Staff Writer

Once they are together, however, the rigid social barriers that separate these five characters begin to disintegrate. They begin to realize that their social stereotypes are not indicative of who they are as people. Throughout the movie, these five high school students grow out of their initial archetypes and grow together, becoming friends against social stigma.

There is a message in The Breakfast Club that everyone, not just high schoolers, can benefit from. Constraining oneself to any single social stereotype circumvents life experience, causes undue prejudice and wanton malevolence, and narrows interaction.

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