All the Light We Cannot See

All the Light We Cannot See

Eli Aleck, Student Contributor

For as much as I have read, Anthony Doerr knows how to pull me into the book. All the Light We Cannot See is probably the second best book I have read in my years. The story keeps going, and you do not know what is going to happen. The two main characters start off as youngsters and grow older, and more and more happen to them.
The beginning starts off nice and goes back and forth with the two telling you about their parents and if they died. They tell you their problems. One character is Werner, an orphan in a coal mining town with his sister. He is older and looks after her and does everything with her. Their dad died in the coal mine, and they do not know what happened to their mom. Another character, Marie-Laure, lives in France with her dad. She has progressive vision loss, so throughout the book she is always with her father.
It is World War II, so it is really interesting to see the viewpoints of people in Germany and France. Werner is super intelligent. He finds a radio and fixes it, and at night he would listen to it with his sister. One time he finds a broadcast about how their forces are going to bomb a city, Paris, I think, and later you are with Marie and her father at the museum he works at, and events are going on, but she does not know what is happening. Noises are everywhere around you, frantic people are everywhere and your father is taking you somewhere to get out of the city. They cannot get on a train or anything else, so they have to walk to another city. As this happens to her throughout the book, you imagine it with her. Now Werner is in a “school” for the kids to become Nazis, although Werner is more interested in engineering.